Review: The Invention of Hugo Cabret

January 30, 2011 § 3 Comments

Look at this and tell me you still don't want to read. LOOK at it.

 

Because I could go on and on and on about how fantastic this book is, I’m going to try and limit myself to 200 words on the subject. Here’s what you need to know: this book is completely innovative and hard to classify. It’s a graphic novel, but it’s not structured like any comic or graphic novel I’ve ever seen. It’s a children’s book, but on par with the highest quality adult books I’ve read. It’s thick as a door-stopper, but a fast read. It’s a mystery, but it’s also great as a piece of historical fiction. And best of all, it has magicians and a robot (technically an automata). I’d love to tell you more about the plot, but the only real way to describe it without going into a confusing diatribe is to just read it.  A quick set-up of the beginning, just for you who need more to go on: Hugo Cabret is an orphan living in a Paris train station in the late 1930’s or early 40’s. He keeps mostly to himself, trying to figure out the mysterious automata his father had been working to repair before his death. It’s only when Hugo gets tangled up with the train station’s toy shop owner (and his young niece??) that the mystery begins to take shape, and in the process, Hugo uncovers a history bigger than he ever imagined.

And it looks like I went over my word count. Totally worth it.

P.S.: Above image found here.

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